Politics

Sherlock Holmes

The very murky death of Jeffrey Epstein has once again focused public attention on the gross distortions that money, politics and patronage have wrought on a supposedly impartial legal system. With the FBI having been caught out protecting Hillary Clinton while trying to hound a duly elected President from office, we shake our heads sadly at the blatant and frankly terrifying politicisation of a once respected law enforcement agency.

At least we don't have such a dangerously partisan legal culture in this country, right?

Right?

Anyone who thinks such a systemic corruption of policing priorities couldn't happen here should consider the questions swirling around the Carl Beech fiasco. It's illuminating and depressing to compare and contrast the unfounded witch hunt of Operation Midland with the way Operation Central was eventually, finally and grudgingly launched in 2008.

The Metropolitan Police could barely contain their glee as they turned their huge resources to hounding a group of fading establishment figures at the behest of an obvious fantasist. Warrants were obtained, houses were searched and Beech's ludicrous and demonstrably false allegations were declared to be “credible and true” before any investigation had been concluded. The Met were positively salivating at the thought of putting a bunch of old men through the meat grinder, and they weren't going to let a complete absence of credible evidence stand in their way.

I'm sure it's just a coincidence that the accused men were retired Tories or their supporters.

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Little girl hiding

Don't believe the hype.

Despite all the tall talk and the set-piece protests, a general election is the last thing the Labour Party wants right now, or at any time in the foreseeable future come to think of it.

How do we know this? Well, they could've supported Jo Swinson's pre-emptive confidence motion, tabled the moment Johnson took office, but they didn't have the nerve. The embarrassingly low turnout at the recent national rally also shows that Corbyn fatigue has well and truly taken hold.

Whatever Boris Johnson's faults may be, his first Commons session as Prime Minister shows that he's willing to go there, as our American friends say.

The look on Jeremy Corbyn's face said it all as Johnson stood at the despatch box and went through the list, beginning with the Labour leader's paid appearance on Press TV and ending with his now viral Invasion of the Body Snatchers jibe. John McDonnell didn't escape the blonde whirlwind either, with a reminder of his sacking by Ken Livingston now part of the official Hansard record.

Within the space of five minutes, Johnson tore up the cultural rulebook and exposed the hollowness, vacuousness and moral bankruptcy of the Labour front bench. Their preferred weapon of virtue signalling class politics was neutralised at a stroke, leaving them all but defenceless. I might've felt sorry for them, were they not such a dangerous and downright vindictive group of people.

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Bullseye

Barring some unforeseen calamity, it seems pretty much certain that Boris Johnson will soon be the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. He owes much of his popularity with the Tory party and the wider public to his easily understood and uncompromising stance on Brexit. He's made it clear on numerous occasions that Theresa May's disastrous withdrawal deal is dead and that the United Kingdom will be leaving the EU on October 31st, with or without any kind of trade deal in place.

The pundit classes have been at pains to point out how the problems of Parliamentary arithmetic persist regardless of who occupies Downing Street. There have already been dark threats from the likes of Dominic Grieve to vote with the opposition and bring down the government if Prime Minister Johnson attempts to take Britain out of the EU on WTO terms. We may yet see if such people have the courage of their convictions because that scenario is entirely possible.

However, in common with Donald Trump across the pond, Johnson is not nearly as dumb as the chattering classes like to think he is, and he's had more than two years to plan his strategy. His uncompromising stance on the biggest issue in a generation shows that he is not the slightest bit scared of Parliament or the mainstream media class.

In other words, he knows he can't miss.

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Karl Marx

The earth has heaved and the landscape can never return to its previous contours. Maps must be redrawn and a new language for navigation established following the seismic results of the European elections. Today the world looks different across the continent, not just in Britain.

The stunning success of the Brexit Party here in the UK is clearly driven by a deep seated resentment at the shameless shenanigans of our political class over the last three years. However, this uniquely British problem alone does not explain the triumph of Le Pen's National Rally, Salvini's Lega or Kaczyński's Law and Justice party to name but a few.

There can be no denying it any longer. National identity, Euroscepticism and populism are on the rise across the continent in a way that transcends language, custom and cultural differences. Whilst Farage's Brexit Party shares some similarities with other Eurosceptic movements, there are also many differences between them. What binds them together in opposition to the centrist dominance of past decades is what Marxists would recognise as a growing sense of class consciousness.

It's so much bigger than just Brexit. Here in Britain, what began as a poorly defined sense of alienation has developed into a clear realisation that a large percentage of the population are viewed as little more than dangerously ignorant tax fodder by the established political class. As a result of this realisation, the Brexiteers' trust in political and cultural institutions has collapsed, to be replaced by an understanding that organisation and confrontation are the only viable methods to achieve their broader political and cultural goals.

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