Politics

It's nice to agree with your most implacable opponents every now and then. That's why I was especially cheered to hear Patrick Stewart's reasoned and measured arguments as he championed the new People's Vote movement in various television studios nearly a fortnight ago. It's hard to deny that we'd never make different, better decisions if we could see further into the future. After all, how many of us wouldn't want to turn back the clock and not have a particular argument, or choose a different path that didn't lead to a dead end?

When it comes to weighty matters of state, we all cast our votes based more on hope and belief than any meaningful knowledge of the future. That inescapable truth probably explains why we're permanently disappointed that our destination bears only a passing semblance to the exciting postcard we received. So it's with a big dose of hindsight and a little humility that I've come to embrace the idea of a second referendum on Britain's membership of the European Union. The landscape is so dramatically different and so many arguments resoundingly disproved that I can see no other alternative. We're just not where we thought we would be.

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Whatever you might think of her politics or personality, there's no denying Theresa May's tenacity and dogged determination. So far she's confounded all the doomsayers who prophesised that the Brexit talks would never get this far. Predictions of Jeremy Corbyn celebrating Christmas in Number 10 have vanished from more than one blog, and gleeful tweets about the imminent local election meltdown have been recycled into memes of mirth all across cyberspace.

Despite being a little grating and not especially charismatic, the Prime Minister has nonetheless managed to retain, and in some cases gain, the loyalty of an electorate which has come to grudgingly admire her patient if bureaucratically dull approach to an increasingly ill-tempered, intransigent and deliberately discourteous European Union.

Contrary to what the more unhinged factions of the Remainosphere might say, the Brexiteer who thought this would all be a breeze is a rare and strange beast indeed. The British electorate backed Brexit in the full knowledge that there would be more than a couple of bumps in the road as we embarked on the biggest constitutional upheaval in a generation. How could there not be?

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So, it's finally happened. The entrenched establishment's last desperate gamble to thwart Brexit has cranked into life amid great fanfare, tons of publicity and a million pound budget.

Of course they don't call it that. When questioned on their attitude to Brexit, this elitist coalition of closet authoritarians hide their disdain for democracy behind phrases like "choice", "new information" and "the terms of divorce." They are always, always at pains to stress just how much they respect the result of the 2016 referendum.

This is a brazen, calculated lie, and we all know it. In fact, arch luvvie and continuity Remainer Patrick Stewart couldn't even convince the BBC's Andrew Marr of his sincerity when asked about respecting the Brexit vote. Either he wasn't properly briefed by the "People's Vote" campaign, or he's decided that honesty is the best policy. Whether by accident or design, we should thank Mr Stewart for saving us all the time and trouble of trying to prize the truth from this dishonest and deceitful campaign's lips for the next year or so.

One of the more reliable rules of politics is that any nation with the words "democratic" or "people's" anywhere in its name should be treated with extreme caution, and the same can be said of political campaigns. Ironically enough the "people" understand this fundamental truth well enough, which is why this this last hurrah from the fading neo-liberals will expend a lot of time, energy and hot air with no discernible outcome. Kind of like having a counsellor on a spaceship.

The People's Vote is doomed.

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The evidence suggests it doesn't.

It feels like forever since Britain voted to leave the EU in June 2016. Following that momentous day, the long-suffering British public have been buried by a blizzard of headlines, briefings, position papers and statements of principle. Everything from security, to the Irish border, through citizens' rights, the "divorce bill" and back to the Irish border has been subjected to the most intense scrutiny and debate. Offers, rejections, accusations and counter-offers have become the new normal for Anglo-Brussels relations.

The only subject consistently absent from this flurry of proposals and propaganda is trade.

Funny that.

It's become increasingly clear that the EU is desperate to talk about everything except trade. It's surely no accident that the first phase of the exit negotiations makes no mention of any future trading relationship between us, and now that phase is concluded, the thorny issue of the Irish border has popped up once again, seemingly from nowhere.

The EU knows perfectly well that its so-called "backstop" position on the Ireland issue is completely unacceptable to the UK. So why go to the trouble of including it in the draft Brexit treaty?

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What do Brexit, a loaf of bread and a high profile environmental campaign have in common? You might be tempted to answer "not very much," but they are in fact linked by deeper, hidden forces which are currently the rise of populism and the rejection of the neo-liberal world view.

It's not often that everyday objects like a sliced white can speak so much truth, but that's exactly what happened in the bread aisle as I endured the ritual torture of grocery shopping. I'd arrived at the supermarket earlier than planned, having fled the house after Sky News tried to force feed me another helping of environmental advocacy. Now don't get me wrong, it's true that the amount of plastic polluting our world is a real and pressing problem, and I for one am pleased that such a large organisation is bringing attention to this urgent and important issue.

There were films of plastic, debates about plastic and statistics surrounding plastic still rolling around in my head while I engaged in the drudgery of the supermarket shop. First stop was the fruit and veg, and I immediately recalled the apocryphal tale of four apples shrink-wrapped on a plastic tray, which is often cited as the pinnacle of ridiculous and completely unnecessary plastic packaging.* In fairness there are very few people who'd approve of such a thing in today's more environmentally conscious climate, but still it happened once upon a time.

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I donated money to Oxfam last year…and so did you if you're a UK taxpayer. That's how generous we are here in Blighty. We give without even knowing or being asked.

In fact the UK government donated over £200 million of taxpayer's cash to Oxfam alone in 2016. Tax free of course.

That's not charity. It's State policy, sub-contracted through the cuddly sounding "aid sector."

I've no idea how many trillions of dollars the developed world has given away in aid these past decades, but we've seen precious little progress to show for it. With seemingly endless conflict, famine and migration crises, our generosity seems to have done almost nothing to alleviate the Developing World's most acute social and economic problems. A true cynic might begin to wonder if the "aid sector" has any real interest in actually solving any societal and cultural problems. After all, it could be argued that increased prosperity and self-reliance are bad for the aid business as they diminish demand, and overseas aid donations have become big, big business.

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